Month: February 2016

Too Much on Your Plate? Here’s Advice from a Mindfulness Teacher

I hope that your plates are full today — but not too full — and that you’re enjoying every bite. Does that seem like a tall order? In an age when we often have too much on our plates, and yet are hungry for real nourishment, the aspiration expressed above may be much easier to say than to accomplish. In the video above, I ask Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction teacher Janet Solyntjes about this conundrum, as well as about a particular, personal style of becoming stressed out. I find her responses to be very helpful, and I think that you may also. If you’d like to watch the full interview, or stream/download the audio, click here: Freak Out! Or Not: An Interview with MBSR Teacher Janet Solyntjes I hope that these teachings add a flavor of awakenment to your day, and that you’ll forgive me if I’ve piled on the food metaphors too high in this post. Shambhala Mountain Center hosts Introduction to Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction with Janet Solyntjes, March 11-13, 2016 — click …

Cheerful Shambhala Day!

Last week we celebrated Shambhala Day — a holiday based on Losar (Tibetan New Year/Lunar New Year). It’s a time to purify, make aspirations for the new year, and honor our cultural & spiritual tradition as a community. We welcomed the Year of the Fire Monkey with festivities that began with a 7:30am walk to the Stupa as the sun rose. There we performed a lhasang (offering of juniper), chants, and ate a delicious breakfast. We then watched the Sakyong’s Shambhala Day address, streamed live from Boulder & featuring messages from Shambhala Centers all over the world. That evening we dressed in our finest for a celebratory feast and waltz performance/dance party. May 2016 bring you all joy and courage! Here are some photos from our experience:      

Understanding the Interplay Between Karma and Trauma

In a previous post, we shared the first part of an illuminating dialogue between Julie Flynn Badal and Dr. Miles Neale — a Buddhist psychotherapist.  That article offered a fresh presentation of the Buddhist notion of karma, and discussed how Buddhist psychotherapy offers a way of working with challenging habitual patterns.  Here in part two, we’d like to deepen the exploration by addressing the topic of trauma — how it is related to karma, and what some effective ways of healing may be.    Click here to read Julie’s helpful introduction to this discussion as well as the first part of this interview.  Julie Flynn Badal: In describing the hallmarks of Buddhist psychotherapy, you spoke of including the role of the body in the process of emotional healing. I’ve noticed that your meditation courses and retreats frequently include yoga. How does Buddhism view the relationship between mind and body? Miles Neale: Current neuroscience has clearly shown that unprocessed trauma is often stored somatically as fragmented, implicit memory. You can spend years in psychotherapy from the neck up, talking about past …

Lodro Rinzler Discusses Daily Meditation and Retreat

If you are reading this, you are most likely not in a cave somewhere in the Himalayas, without distraction, and devoting all of your days and evenings to meditation practice. More likely, you are a person with a job, relationships, and various commitments and interests in addition to meditation. You are a modern day meditation practitioner. Practitioner. Why do we use that word? That question is at the heart of much of Lodro Rinzler’s teachings. As he puts it, what we are practicing for, when we are sitting on the cushion, is the rest of the hours of our waking day. We meditate so that we can show up more fully: in our work, families, social gatherings, and so on. Enjoy the video above, or click below to stream the audio. If you’d like to download the audio file, click here and find the “Download” button. The idea of continuity is important here. Being a meditation practitioner is not just about putting in our time on the cushion, and then calling it quits until tomorrow’s session. …