Month: September 2017

How to Communicate Well in the Heat of the Moment

By Janet Mueller // I am always looking for good analogies to help people grow in their capacity to communicate with strength and compassion, especially it if can help us get a better sense of why communication can be so challenging sometimes. There is one I’ve been using recently that captures the contradictions we experience so many times with communication: While it is easy to pass the written test, we often fail the practical exam. Most of us, most of the time are pretty good at communicating. We go through life, talking with others and figuring out what we need to. But when we are in a difficult communication, when we are in the heat of the moment, all the skills and talents we usually have seem to disappear. When it comes to dealing with conflict, this seems to be the case across the board. When I ask any group – young people, professionals, parents – they all have a great list of things they could do when faced with conflict. This list includes things …

Mindful Eating

Mindful Eating: Why Bother?

By Marcella Friel // It’s so easy to believe that our struggles with food are our fault. It’s so seductive to blame and punish ourselves for our failed attempts to curb our less-than-mindful eating habits. However … Not only is such self-condemnation counterproductive (as in, “the beatings will continue until morale improves”), it also blinds us to the social realities that got us into this predicament to begin with. Food is the most fundamental expression of human culture. According to Zen chef Edward Espe Brown, “In cultures where eating rituals were widespread, people experienced few eating disorders. Conversely, we see that ours is a culture with few eating rituals and numerous disorders.” In our industrialized, setting-sun world, our eating rituals consist of opening take-out cartons, eating at our desks, grazing mindlessly, or chowing down microwaved meals while checking Facebook. If the purpose of food is strictly to provide nutrition for our bodies, why should we care about how we actually eat? In this video I invite you to explore the social and cultural forces that …

Advice for Setting New Year Intentions (Rather than Resolutions)

For the past several years, Shastri Jon Barbierri has come up to Shambhala Mountain Center to lead a group retreat designed to help people enter the new year with strength, intention, and joy.  In this short interview, Jon shares some wisdom related to this process of setting intentions rather than resolutions, as well as what he’s learned from leading this retreat year after year. Enjoy the video below, or scroll down to stream/download the audio. Shambhala Mountain Center hosts Take a Leap into 2018: Establish Your Intention and Commitment with Shastri Jon Barbieri, December 29, 2017–January 1, 2018 — click here to learn more Audio may be streamed below.  To download, follow this link, click “More,” click “Download.” Featured image by Corey Ruffner About the Authors Shastri Jonathan Barbieri is a senior teacher in the Shambhala Lineage who has taught Buddhist and Shambhala trainings extensively throughout North America for over 30 years. Jon has been engaged in several livelihood pursuits including consulting with cities and counties on workforce development, creating contemplative co-housing communities, and, most …

Judith Simmer-Brown

[VIDEO] Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown: Loving-Kindness Meditation

In this video, which originally aired as part of SMC’s Beyond Mindfulness event, Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown guides us in practicing loving-kindness for ourselves—which is, as she reminds us, the basis for having compassion for others. Join Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown for Compassion Training: The Practice and Science of Compassion for Self and Others, October 14–20, 2017, at Shambhala Mountain Center — click here to learn more About the Author Acharya Judith Simmer-Brown, Ph.D., is Distinguished Professor of Contemplative and Religious Studies at Naropa University in Boulder, Colorado, where she has taught since 1978. As Buddhist practitioner since the early 1970’s, she became a student of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche in 1974, and was empowered as an acharya (senior teacher) by Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche in 2000. Her teaching specialties are meditation practice, Shambhala teachings, Buddhist philosophy, tantric Buddhism, and contemplative higher education. Her book, Dakini’s Warm Breath (Shambhala 2001), explores the feminine principle as it reveals itself in meditation practice and everyday life for women and men. She has also edited Meditation and the Classroom: Contemplative Pedagogy for …