Author: smcblog

First, Do No Harm: The Need for Trauma-Sensitive Mindfulness

By David Treleaven, Ph.D. // Trauma is big in the news these days. So is mindfulness. On first glance, this appears to be a good thing: But when we look deeper, things get more complicated. David Treleaven, PhD, talks about how we can implement mindfulness and meditation programs in a trauma-sensitive way. A few months ago, I was approached with a problem by a colleague who taught meditation in a classroom setting. Here was the issue: a student of hers had lost her father to COVID-19, and was struggling with symptoms of traumatic stress. When she’d meditate, images and sensations would flood her field of consciousness, leaving her more rattled than before. “Should I keep meditating?” she’d asked my colleague. “I want to work with my stress, but practicing seems to be making things worse. What should I do?” This is a conversation I’d been having for years with meditation teachers and practitioners all over the world. Given the global pandemic, this conversation has become even more frequent and intense. What should we do when …

[WATCH] Townhall with Michael Gayner from Sat. Oct. 3

Town Hall meeting with Michael Gayner, in which he shares the latest information and answers questions regarding the impact of the Cameron Peak Fire on SMC. Timeline of topics and questions 3:00 – Future email updates 4:00 – Gratitude for support 4:50 – Yesterday’s visit – firefighters 5:25 – Cameron Peak Fire and Mullen Fire “We’re not out of the woods yet” 7:00 – “Nature is already beginning to reclaim and rebuild” 7:30 – The rebuilding of SMC 8:30 – Staff housing 9:30 – The finances of SMC 10:15 – Reopening 11:50 – Insurance – “insurance will not cover everything that is lost” 14:10 – What was lost and what survived (Kami Shrine, Tori Gate, MPE Kitchen are still there) 15:45  – What are the “legacy staff buildings?” Which are gone, which are still standing? 17:30  – Tent platforms 17:45  – General return to the land for staff – safety, finances, etc. 20:00  – Volunteer work 21:00  – Stupa art work – status and restoration 21:55  –  Opening for visitors and programs 22:50  – Security …

“THIS Is the Spiritual Path.” Sara Avant Stover on Crisis and Opportunity

In this short teaching, best-selling author and spiritual teacher Sara Avant Stover offers encouragement for healing through this tumultuous moment — on the personal and collective levels — by not turning away from unwanted experience. Enjoy the 5 minute video below, and learn about our upcoming online retreat with Sara here. VIDEO Join Sara for this upcoming online retreat! About Sara Avant Stover Sara Avant Stover is a teacher of feminine spirituality and empowerment, bestselling author, and founder of The Way of the Happy Woman®. After a cancer scare in her early twenties, Sara moved to Thailand, embarked on a decade-long healing and spiritual odyssey throughout Asia, and has since gone on to uplift tens of thousands of women worldwide. Sara has also been featured in Yoga Journal, the Huffington Post, Newsweek, Natural Health, and on ABC, NBC, and CBS. She lives in Santa Barbara, CA. Visit her online at www.TheWayoftheHappyWoman.com

In the Times of Coronavirus: How to Be Informed Without Being Overwhelmed

By Megan Prager // Is it possible in this time to stay informed and not be totally overwhelmed? Like many, I find myself consuming a large amount of media. There are beautiful stories of people supporting one another, as well as many stories and statistics of suffering that can leave us in wonder and fear. Recently the World Health Organization put out a list of Considerations to Support Mental Health in the times of COVID-19, with one recommendation being:  Minimize watching, reading or listening to news about COVID-19 that causes you to feel anxious or distressed… seek information updates at specific times during the day, once or twice. The sudden and near-constant stream of news reports about an outbreak can cause anyone to feel worried.  Important advice indeed. When we aren’t intentional about consuming news related to COVID-19 both in terms of content and amount, we can easily experience feelings of distress and overwhelm. Here is the thing about overwhelm: It doesn’t feel good! We suffer when we feel it. What we know about optimal adult learning (based …

Grief in the Time of COVID: Sharing in Compassion and Resilience (excerpt)

By Holly Gayley // When my father went into the hospital on May 6th, there were 76,000 deaths in the US from COVID-19. By the time he passed away eleven days later, there were 90,000. It’s strange when something as deeply and personally felt as the death of a loved one becomes part of a national statistic. Yet it also points to the collective nature of grief related to the pandemic and the systemic injustices that it has revealed and intensified. We are in a time of collective grief. Some of us have lost loved ones to COVID-19. Others have lost jobs or been furloughed due to the lockdown of cities and towns across the country. On top of all that, since the killing of George Floyd on May 25, the streets have been filled with renewed anguish and calls for racial justice and the end of police brutality. The enormity of the crisis affects us all, directly or indirectly. How can we handle the emotional intensity and grief while supporting each other in the …

Simple Strategies to Feel Well & Break Through in Today’s Uncertainty

By Blake D. Bauer // With everything that’s going on in the world it’s very natural to feel overwhelmed, worried and confused. Every emotion you’re feeling within yourself is valid. Helplessness, sadness, anger, and frustration are all healthy responses to the various situations we’re facing within our homes, our communities, our workplaces, and across the world.  Many people are feeling the need to act and reclaim both their power and their voice. This is happening in personal relationships behind closed doors as well as out in our communities, all of which is purposeful and necessary. As individuals we are facing challenges on every level of our being and in all aspects of our lives. Today more than ever, it’s both critical and potentially life-saving to have practical tools that help us to feel more centered, clear-minded, and secure within ourselves. Instead of shutting down, numbing out, pretending you’re okay, or becoming paralyzed, I invite you to test the following views and practices for yourself and the people in your life. I promise they will help …