All posts tagged: Work

Mindful Work

4 Proven Ways to Awaken Purpose at Work

By Zach Mercurio // There’s no shortage of advice telling us we need to find purpose in our jobs. And for good reason—having a sense of purpose at work can increase both engagement and fulfillment. In our personal lives, a sense of purpose can even help us sleep better, feel healthier, and live longer. Yet while it’s clear purpose is important, it’s less clear how to discover it without taking expensive purpose surveys, quitting our sometimes mundane jobs, or making drastic career changes. But there is hope for everyday people in everyday jobs to discover purpose and reap its benefits. Over the last few years, I’ve been lucky enough to work with people who do our society’s necessary and repetitive work—people like janitors, bus drivers, and mechanics. And I’ve learned two critical lessons: 1.) There is a compelling purpose in every job, and 2.) There are research-backed actions we can take to uncover it. Here’s how to start. 1. Stop trying to “find” your why. One of the biggest misconceptions about purpose is that it’s …

Floral Notes and Bardo: How?

Floral Notes and Bardo: The Creative Chronicles of a Shambhala Mountain Resident is a regular feature on the SMC blog in which a member of our staff/community shares his experience of living as part of Shambhala Mountain Center. How? Writing in the office now, after asking permission from my fellows to turn off the flickering overhead fluorescent lights.  Now, going to put on headphones to at least discourage folks from interrupting me.  If the people on the other side of the room begin talking loudly, or at all, I’ll turn on the brown noise. Ideally, I’d write at home. Activating brown noise now. Oh, rhythm of computerized brown noise.  Soothing, on some level.  To the extent that it drowns out the chatter in English language that attacks me.  On another level, it sucks. Anyway… Ideally I’d write at home, but I’m finding it difficult to do it all — morning offerings, cleaning body, tea, journaling, pillow time with Heather, full practice session, dharma study, breakfast — and also make it down to work at a decent hour.  Coming …

Floral Notes and Bardo: Time and Flowers, People

By Travis Newbill Floral Notes and Bardo: The Creative Chronicles of a Shambhala Mountain Resident is a daily feature on the SMC blog in which a member of our staff/community shares his experience of existing as part of Shambhala Mountain Center. Fun with Rebbi — Heather’s mom — the last few days. Wondrous artist-human.  Delightful, and glad to be connecting.  Last night, the three of us in my house singing Beatles’ songs: “Lil’ darlin’, it’s beena long, cold, lonely, winter…” And now, the sun is bathing us all, the land.  Spring arriving. And, in knowing Rebbi, somehow feeling closer to Heather.  Some sense of greater reality.  Greater humanness.  The truth of the texture of her black hair, and her shoulders. Real people. ~~~ This morning, an hour spent arranging flowers after meditation.  Just an hour, because, I have to be on the clock for a certain amount of time each week in the marketing chair, and my schedule is rather tight. But, I’m reading this dharma about work and time and so on.  This book form …

Floral Notes and Bardo: Some Hallucinations

By Travis Newbill Floral Notes and Bardo: The Creative Chronicles of a Shambhala Mountain Resident is a daily feature on the SMC blog in which a member of our staff/community shares his experience of existing as part of Shambhala Mountain Center. What am I afraid of? Feeling overwhelmed forever, failing in my endeavors, losing people’s approval, not achieving what I wish to, not receiving the recognition that I crave, not being special at all, being a grain of sand, being fundamentally mistaken, being nothing but a brief-luminous-flare. I really feel the need to go on retreat.  I’m all wound up.  I’m feeling clouded. But… It’s difficult to find the time.  Some people seem to think that living here is like being on one big retreat.  In a sense, that’s true.  But…  I work a lot here.  Most everybody that lives here works a lot.  Between the day-jobs that we have — which keep the business running — and our community service, obligations, participation…  it’s a lot. And… I just realized a couple of days ago that …