Mind-Body
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[WATCH] Dr. Rick Hanson: “Finding Calm and Contentment in Turbulent Times”

 

In this video, filmed live with Shambhala Mountain Center, Dr. Rick Hanson—the renowned psychologist, best-selling author, and meditation teacher—shares techniques and insights that are directly applicable to life in these challenging times.

In addition, Rick has offered a package of bonus material to everyone who finds their way to this video. It includes a few guided meditations, as well as the first chapter of his new book Neurodharma—which just came out May 6!

Click here to get the bonus material!

As Dr. Hanson says:

“The deepest roots of the highest happiness are in the body. At the intersection of modern science and ancient wisdom – which could be called neurodharma – we can find very effective tools for resilient well-being.”

May this be of benefit.

About Rick Hanson

Rick Hanson, Ph.D., is a psychologist, Senior Fellow of the Greater Good Science Center at UC Berkeley, and New York Times best-selling author. His books are available in 28 languages and include ResilientHardwiring HappinessBuddha’s BrainJust One Thing, and Mother Nurture. He’s been an invited speaker at Google, NASA, Oxford, Stanford, and Harvard, and taught in meditation centers worldwide.

6 Comments

  1. Lourdes Alvarez K. says

    Dear Dr. Hanson,

    I had not had the chance to hear you before, though I have been a meditator in Shambhala since 1981…
    I live in Mexico, in a small town, Tepoztlan, where we have a meditation center. I work as a physician, acupuncturist and homeopath, and teach regularly in our center.
    I am very grateful for being able to connect at this time of “isolation” and for your generous offerings. I find your way of talking about working with ourselves at this time a very beautiful fusion of ancient teachings and modern science, but also your kindness and clarity are a gift.

    Muchas gracias

  2. Carol says

    As I watch you speak, I am realizing how much calmer and I feel. I didn’t realize how looking outward rather than inward is calming. I also realized that when I think of someone who makes me smile and loved is something I can visualize. Thank you.

    How can I trigger myself to calm down quickly when I get wound up about anything, and can’t get calm?

  3. Julie Pata says

    Your generosity sincerely touches my heart. Thank you for sharing this wisdom during these challenging times.

  4. Esther says

    Thank you so much. I always find your teachings a source of love and peace
    I certainly look forward to have access to the first chapter of your book

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